Last edited by Sazshura
Wednesday, January 29, 2020 | History

6 edition of Nickel and Dimed found in the catalog.

Nickel and Dimed

On (Not) Getting By in America

by Barbara Ehrenreich

  • 132 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Metropolitan Books .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Women"s studies,
  • Work & labour,
  • Unskilled labor,
  • Social Science,
  • Unskilled Occupations,
  • Wages,
  • Working poor,
  • Politics / Current Events,
  • Sociology,
  • USA,
  • Government - U.S. Government,
  • Labor & Industrial Relations - General,
  • Sociology - Social Theory,
  • Political Science / Economic Conditions,
  • Business & Economics,
  • Labor,
  • Minimum wage,
  • Poverty,
  • United States

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages224
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7932585M
    ISBN 100805063889
    ISBN 109780805063882

    The terribly sad part is that many see no light at the end of the tunnel. The labor shortage she had been expecting to drive up wages had no effect on the wages she was able to get. Summary Note: summary text provided by external source. Because low-wage workers have very few options, little education, and transportation problems, they may be unable to find a better paying job even knowing that they exist. She also gives herself limits to what she is willing to endure: 1.

    Happily, though, my fears turn out to be entirely unwarranted: during a month of poverty and toil, no one recognizes my face or my name, which goes unnoticed and for the most part unuttered. This article talks about how Barbara struggled through her low-income life at the time in Florida. They spend most of their lunch breaks and picking up a few items, such as potato chips, at a local convenience store and eating it in the car. Anthropologically speaking, the trailer park would be preferable, but here I have a gleaming white floor and a firm mattress, and the few resident bugs are easily vanquished. Her sleeping problems ceased and she feels much better during the day at work. She aligns herself with scientists, not performers, noting that she holds a Ph.

    Some of the older women are unable to vacuum because of the difficulty of wearing it so. Ehrenreich finds the manager, B. Do I think safety on the job is the responsibility of management? She remembers that even in the s, when her fellow college students sought jobs in factories to organize the working class, she was not interested.


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Nickel and Dimed book

Her good health, her means of transportation, and the fact that she did not have children in tow already set her apart from the prototypical low-wage single mother. In the case of Barbara Ehrenreich, her novel Nickel and Dimed is a compelling story that conveys her experiences while discovering what it is like to be a blue collar worker.

Ted, the boss, is strict with the women who work for him and keeps them to a rigid schedule that they must adhere to. She also describes the unskilled jobs as being not only physically and mentally challenging, but a difficult place to work because of the employee politics that go on.

Nickel and Dimed: On Not Getting By in America, by Barbara Ehrenreich, specifically highlights a more modern time period, from the late s to the early s. Ehrenreich was not thrilled about undertaking the task herself.

The restaurant, like most of the places she works, is not revealed by its true name in her book, nor are the people she meets. He conducts regular meetings for all employees in order to discuss emergency scenarios and to warn them not to talk to each other.

Notes - The introduction to this book begins on an ironic note--while eating at an over-priced restaurant, Ehrenreich considers how women entering the workforce due to welfare reform are going to make it at the dangerously lowwages available to them.

Anyone in the educated classes who thinks otherwise ought to broaden their circle of friends. Upon leaving her housekeeping job, she reveals her true reason for having each job, and is not met with the surprise she had expected.

And one job is not enough; you need at least two if you intend to live indoors. Most of the places where Ehrenreich worked had policies against the employees talking to each other in one capacity or another.

She begins discussing unions and what they could do for the employees. The safety net—ATM card, bank account, actual home—would always loom large. There are a myriad of question surrounding the lives of those people who are hanging by a thread, the minimum-wage workers.

Ehrenreich portrays herself as a recently divorced woman with the skills of a homemaker. To be a member of the working poor is to be an anonymous donor, a nameless benefactor, to everyone. The nursing home job, consists mainly of feeding the residents of the nursing home and cleaning up the food items.

We rate each piece of content on a scale of 1—10 with regard to these two core criteria. Telemarketing, one of the first refuges of the suddenly indigent, can be dismissed on grounds of personality. The only affordable place she can find is a rundown motel with no bolts on the door and no screen on the window.

Mostly, though, no one speaks to me or even looks at me except to offer an application form. Another is George, a Czech dishwasher in the country for one week and unable to speak more than a few sentences in English.

The interview is multiple-choice: Do I have anything, such as child care problems, that might make it hard for me to get to work on time? Would I turn in a fellow employee if I caught him stealing?

Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in A...

She laments the lack of any encouragement or compliments from her coworkers on her performance, and decides she was average, but capable.

For the remainder of her introductory chapter, Ehrenreich details the parameters she set for her endeavor. About the Author Barbara Ehrenreich has written 12 books and contributes often to national magazines. She decides that had she continued in a few of the jobs, such as the one at Wal-Mart, she would have fared well and been eventually raised in position and pay.Aug 01,  · The "New York Times" bestseller, and one of the most talked about books of the year, Ni"ckel and Dimed" has already become a classic of undercover reportage.

Millions of Americans work for poverty-level wages, and one day Barbara Ehrenreich decided to join atlasbowling.com by: With nearly a million copies in print, Nickel and Dimed is a modern classic that deftly portrays the plight of America's working-class poor.

A successful author, Barbara Ehrenreich decides to see if she can scratch out a comfortable living in a blue-collar America obsessed with welfare "reform". Summary Note: summary text provided by external source. The New York Times bestseller, and one of the most talked about books of the year, Nickel and Dimed has already become a classic of undercover atlasbowling.comns of Americans work for poverty-level wages.

Aug 18,  · Still Nickel and Dimed a Decade Later. By Stacey of Barbara Ehrenreich’s modern classic “Nickel and Dimed: revisits some of the workers she met while reporting her book. Author: Stacey Mickelbart. insight, humor, and passion, this book is changing the way America perceives its working poor.

About the author Barbara Ehrenreich is the author of Nickel and Dimed, Blood Rites, The Worst Years of Our Lives (a New York Times bestseller), Fear of Falling, which was nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, and eight other books.

from Nickel and Dimed chronicles her initial effort to live as an unskilled worker in con-temporary America. A stunt? Sure. But those tempted to write it off as an exercise in bleeding-heart liberalism would be wise to reflect on the embarrassing truth it explores: America may be rich, but the fruits of its wealth are capriciously and.